Quotes

"Once you get used to it, insanity can be the most normal thing in the world." — John Brent as Geetz Romo

"In concept, concept and reality are the same, but in reality, concept and reality are not the same at all." — Bill Aulet

"When you are content to be simply yourself, and don't compare or compete, everybody will respect you." — Lao Tzu

"…they mistakenly believe a high-standards, six-page memo can be written in one or two days or even a few hours, when really it might take a week or more! The great memos are written and re-written, shared with colleagues who are asked to improve the work, set aside for a couple of days, and then edited again with a fresh mind. They simply can’t be done in a day or two.”" — Jeff Bezos

"Productivity in the wrong direction isn’t worth anything at all. Think more about what to work on." — Sam Altman

"You'll see I wear only gray or blue suits. I'm trying to pare down decisions. I don't want to make decisions about what I'm eating or wearing. Because I have too many other decisions to make." — Barack Obama

"Know, first, who you are; and then adorn yourself accordingly." — Epictetus

"When asked 'What are you?' I am often tempted to answer proudly: I'm a writer. Yet I seldom do, because it is not only pretentiously silly but also inaccurate—I feel I am a writer only at the time of writing. So I say I am complicated." — Aleksandar Hemon

"Real persons love each other as a luxury; it is not a need. They enjoy sharing: they have so much joy; they would like to pour it into somebody. And they know how to play their life as a solo instrument." — Osho

"Longevity is an uncommon extension of the fear of death." — Ambrose Bierce

"I've learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights. I've learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you'll miss them when they're gone from your life. I've learned that making a living is not the same thing as making a life. I've learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance. I've learned that you shouldn't go through life with a catcher's mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw some things back. I've learned that whenever I decide something with an open heart, I usually make the right decision. I've learned that even when I have pains, I don't have to be one. I've learned that every day you should reach out and touch someone. People love a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back. I've learned that I still have a lot to learn. I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel." — Maya Angelou

"It's part of the nature of man to start with romance and build to a reality." — Ray Bradbury

"For instance, I stand at the seashore, alone, and start to think. There are the rushing waves… mountains of molecules, each stupidly minding its own business… trillions apart… yet forming white surf in unison. Ages on ages … before any eyes could see… year after year… thunderously pounding the shore as now. For whom, for what?… on a dead planet, with no life to entertain. Never at rest… tortured by energy… wasted prodigiously by the sun… poured into space. A mite makes the sea roar. Deep in the sea, all molecules repeat the patterns of one another till complex new ones are formed. They make others like themselves… and a new dance starts. Growing in size and complexity … living things, masses of atoms, DNA, protein… dancing a pattern ever more intricate. Out of the cradle onto the dry land … here it is standing … atoms with consciousness… matter with curiosity. Stands at the sea… wonders at wondering… I… a universe of atoms… an atom in the universe." — Richard Feynman

"When you wake up in the morning, tell yourself: The people I deal with today will be meddling, ungrateful, arrogant, dishonest, jealous, and surly. They are like this because they can't tell good from evil." — Marco Aurelio

"Laughter and tears are both responses to frustration and exhaustion. I prefer to laugh, since there is less cleaning up to do afterward." — Kurt Vonnegut

"Just the idea of taking risks, and see the payoff. This is what being alive is all about. You're alive, so you might as well take chances." — Tig Notaro

"Understanding is love's other name. When you love someone, you should have the capacity to bring relief and help him to suffer less. This is an art. In a relationship, if you can see the nature of interbeing between you and the other person, you can see that his suffering is your own suffering, and your happiness is his own happiness. With this way of seeing, you speak and act differently." — Thich Nhat Hanh

"The less justified a man is in claiming excellence for his own self, the more ready is he to claim all excellence for his nation, his religion, his race or his holy cause." — Eric Hoffer

"Time is really the only capital that any human being has, and the only thing he can't afford to lose." — Thomas Edison

"Be committed, not attached. But more importantly, know the difference." — Kai

"Listen to your political enemies, especially the smart ones, and then figure out a way to make them laugh. Nobody likes a bore on a soapbox. Humor is always the best defense and weapon. If you can make an idiot laugh, they'll at least pause and listen before they do something stupid … to you." — John Waters

"Somehow I've been able to make a living doing what I love best for 50 years without ever having to get a real job. But how can you be so disciplined? friends always ask when I tell them my job is to get up every day at 6 A. M. Monday to Friday and think up insane stuff. Easy! If I didn't work this hard for myself, I'd have to go work for somebody else." — John Waters

"In this day and age it isn't enough to fight for the end of racism, sexism, ageism or any other kind of prejudice. Isn't being an outsider soooo 2014? Maybe it's time to throw caution to the wind, really shake things up and reinvent yourself as a new version of your dreaded enemy: the insider, like I am, the final irony. Stay attuned to the creator of chaos in your own field, and strive for that kind of insanity yourself. To be a crazy creative person who finally gets power is the ultimate success for an artist. I never changed but society did. You must learn to make your political opponents laugh, never isolate yourself and don't hate all rich people. Who else is going to back our movies or buy our art? To be truly rich means to have a life free of a–holes. That's rich, and not being around a–holes should be the goal of every graduate here today. Horrify us with new ideas. Outrage outdated critics. Use technology for transgression, not lazy social living. Make me nervous." — John Waters

"When I dance, I dance; when I sleep, I sleep." — Michel De Montaigne

"We all have the same inner life. The difference lies in the recognition. The artist has to recognize what it is." — Agnes Martin

"Be as generous as you can, but selfish enough to get your work done." — Austin Kleon

"I mean, an all-nighter? Stupid. Working in the evenings? I suppose sometimes you have to. But you pay the price the next day. I found keeping a rhythm of five days a week with perhaps some e-mailing on top is really the most I can do." — Austin Kleon

"To forgive is to put oneself in a larger gravitational field of experience than the one that first seemed to hurt us. We reimagine ourselves in the light of our maturity and we reimagine the past in the light of our new identity, we allow ourselves to be gifted by a story larger than the story that first hurt us and left us bereft." — David Whyte

"Ultimately, the truth is that we have to help ourselves — we all benefit from people helping us, but we will never get anywhere if we don't help ourselves… It's not as if I have the answer and I'm giving the answers. I'm, instead, really down there in the struggle, speaking to it, trying to speak as openly as possible about what it means to be human." — Cheryl Strayed

"All of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone." — Blaise Pascal

"We should not, perhaps, underestimate our wish to lose our balance. Indeed, the sign that something does matter to us is that we lose our steadiness." — Adam Phillips

"If we start off by being, at least some of the time, too much for other people during childhood, and become, in adolescence, definitively too much for other people, so much so that we have to leave them, and then become adults who are unavoidably too much for ourselves, what is to be done? Well, one thing that can be done is to find someone we are not too much for…" — Adam Phillips

"We only own something because everybody agrees that we do." — Oliver Jeffers

"Everything can be revised, erased, or rearranged later. The courage of creation is making bad beginnings." — Kevin Ashton

"Igor Stravinsky, one of the great innovators of twentieth-century music, played a Bach fugue on the piano every morning. He started every day like this for years. Then he worked for ten hours. Before lunch he composed. After lunch he orchestrated and transcribed. He did not wait for inspiration. He said, Work brings inspiration if inspiration is not discernible in the beginning." — Kevin Ashton

"Ritual is optional, but consistency is not. Creating requires regular hours of solitude. Time is your main ingredient, so use the highest-quality time to create." — Kevin Ashton

"Good writing is bad writing well edited; a good hypothesis is whatever is left after many experiments fail; good cooking is the result of choosing, chopping, skinning, shelling, and reducing; a great movie has as much to do with what ends up on the cutting room floor as what does not." — Kevin Ashton

"To succeed in the art of new, we must fail freely and frequently. The empty canvas must not stay empty. We have to plunge into it." — Kevin Ashton

"I don't know how this novel will turn out. Naturally, I hope it's good. But best of all is the fact that I'm not afraid of its being bad, literarily speaking, provided I know I've done my best. In the meantime I'm taking great pleasure in living, and in being alone without being a recluse. At night, after I've worked through the day, I walk up Church Avenue to Flatbush and thence down Flatbush, enjoying every minute of the walk. It's incredible how one runs about frantically at times like a rat in a maze, not really knowing right from wrong (and often really not caring), victim of one's own passions and instincts rather than master of one's own soul. I suppose the proper thing to do is just to stop every now and then and say 'Where am I heading?'. Actually, though, I'm still much like the psychologist's rat, I find myself asking myself that question almost too often. I suppose the very fact that I realize my indulgence in too much introspection is another sign (I hope) of maturity. Too much brooding is unhealthy and, although I still have my slumps, I've begun to realize that one of the great secrets is striking a balance between thought and action… Living, acting, thinking; not just vegetating neurotically, on one hand, or blundering about, on the other hand, like so many people do, like trapped flies. It's a hard balance to strike, but I think it can be done, and that in this exciting-sorrowful age of ours it can make great literature. It's somehow all of a sudden wonderfully exciting. Maybe it's just forgetting one's self for a minute, not trying to be smug and self-centered and aloof. And I've learned to do finally — at least with far less effort and self-consciousness — something that three or four years ago you told me was one of the touchstones of maturity: being nice to people even when they're not nice to you… I'll always hate the stupid and the bat-brained and the petty. But it doesn't seem nearly so important anymore to hate, as try to understand." — William Styron

"Dear Human: you've got it all wrong. You didn't come here to master un-conditional love. That in where you came from and where you'll return. You came here to learn personal love. Universal love. Messy love. Sweaty love. Crary love. Broken love. Whole love… You didn't come here to be perfect. You already are. You came here to be gorgeouesly human. Flawed and fabulous. And then to rise again into remembering. But unconditional love? Stop telling that story. Love, in truth, doesn't need ANY other adjectives. It doesn't require modifiers. It doeen't require the condition of perfection. It only asks that you show up. And do your best. That you stay present and feel fully. That you shine and fly and laugh and cry and hurt and heal and fall and get back up and play and work and live and die as you. It's enough. It'plenty." — Courtney A. Walsh

"If you are ready to leave father and mother, and brother and sister, and wife and child and friends, and never see them again — if you have paid your debts, and made your will, and settled all your affairs, and are a free man — then you are ready for a walk." — Henry David Thoreau

"When sometimes I am reminded that the mechanics and shopkeepers stay in their shops not only all the forenoon, but all the afternoon too, sitting with crossed legs, so many of them — as if the legs were made to sit upon, and not to stand or walk upon — I think that they deserve some credit for not having all committed suicide long ago." — Henry David Thoreau

"Prestige is like a powerful magnet that warps even your beliefs about what you enjoy. It causes you to work not on what you like, but what you'd like to like." — Paul Graham

"Writing is hard for every last one of us… Coal mining is harder. Do you think miners stand around all day talking about how hard it is to mine for coal? They do not. They simply dig." — Cheryl Strayed

"Being a motherfucker, it's a way of life, really… It's about having strength rather than fragility, resilience, and faith, and nerve, and really leaning hard into work rather than worry and anxiety. A lot of people think that to be a motherfucker is to be a person who is the dominant figure. But I actually think that true motherfuckerhood… really has to do with being humble. And it's only when you can get out of your own ego that you can actually do what is necessary to do — in a relationship, in your professional life, as a parent, in any of those ways. It has to do with humility — doing the work." — Cheryl Strayed

"The more a person limits himself, the more resourceful he becomes." — Søren Kierkegaard

"The ultimate touchstone of friendship is not improvement, neither of the other nor of the self, the ultimate touchstone is witness, the privilege of having been seen by someone and the equal privilege of being granted the sight of the essence of another, to have walked with them and to have believed in them, and sometimes just to have accompanied them for however brief a span, on a journey impossible to accomplish alone." — David Whyte

"Heartbreak is how we mature; yet we use the word heartbreak as if it only occurs when things have gone wrong: an unrequited love, a shattered dream… But heartbreak may be the very essence of being human, of being on the journey from here to there, and of coming to care deeply for what we find along the way.Heartbreak asks us not to look for an alternative path, because there is no alternative path. It is an introduction to what we love and have loved, an inescapable and often beautiful question, something and someone that has been with us all along, asking us to be ready for the ultimate letting go." — David Whyte

"The great discipline seems to be to give up wanting to control the manner in which we are requited, and to forgo the natural disappointment that flows from expecting an exact and measured reciprocation. Love is the conversation between possible, searing disappointment and a profoundly imagined sense of arrival and fulfillment; how we shape that conversation is the touchstone of our ability to love in the real inhabited world." — David Whyte

"Ideally, you don't speak until you have something honest to say." — TJ Jagodowski

"The nature of the trap is with your not even knowing it, acquiescing. Once people know what they know, they make the unconscious assumption that they were born knowing what they know, and forget that they had to learn everything they know." — James Baldwin

"If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. Wherever you are — if you are following your bliss, you are enjoying that refreshment, that life within you, all the time.
A sacred space is an absolute necessity for anybody today. You must have a room, or a certain hour or so a day, where you don't know what was in the newspapers that morning, you don't know who your friends are, you don't know what you owe anybody, you don't know what anybody owes to you. At first you may find that nothing happens there. But if you have a sacred place and use it, something eventually will happen. If you do follow your bliss you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. When you can see that, you begin to meet people who are in the field of your bliss, and they open the doors to you. I say, follow your bliss and don't be afraid, and doors will open where you didn't know they were going to be." — Joseph Campbell

"There's something inside you that knows when you're in the center, that knows when you're on the beam or off the beam. And if you get off the beam to earn money, you've lost your life. And if you stay in the center and don't get any money, you still have your bliss." — Joseph Campbell

"Understanding someone's suffering is the best gift you can give another person. Understanding is love's other name. If you don't understand, you can't love. Sometimes we haven't had the time to understand ourselves, yet we've already found the object of our love. When we realize that all our hopes and expectations of course can't be fulfilled by that person, we continue to feel empty. You want to find something, but you don't know what to search for. In everyone there's a continuous desire and expectation; deep inside, you still expect something better to happen. That is why you check your email many times a day!" — Thich Nhat Hanh

"The essence of loving kindness is being able to offer happiness. You can be the sunshine for another person. You can't offer happiness until you have it for yourself. So build a home inside by accepting yourself and learning to love and heal yourself. Learn how to practice mindfulness in such a way that you can create moments of happiness and joy for your own nourishment. Then you have something to offer the other person. If you have enough understanding and love, then every moment — whether it's spent making breakfast, driving the car, watering the garden, or doing anything else in your day — can be a moment of joy. In true love, there's no more separation or discrimination. His happiness is your happiness. Your suffering is his suffering. You can no longer say, That's your problem. When you love someone, you have to have trust and confidence. Love without trust is not yet love. Of course, first you have to have trust, respect, and confidence in yourself. Trust that you have a good and compassionate nature. You are part of the universe; you are made of stars. When you look at your loved one, you see that he is also made of stars and carries eternity inside. Looking in this way, we naturally feel reverence. True love cannot be without trust and respect for oneself and for the other person." — Thich Nhat Hanh

"To love without knowing how to love wounds the person we love. To know how to love someone, we have to understand them. To understand, we need to listen. When you love someone, you should have the capacity to bring relief and help him to suffer less. This is an art. If you don't understand the roots of his suffering, you can't help, just as a doctor can't help heal your illness if she doesn't know the cause. You need to understand the cause of your loved one's suffering in order to help bring relief. The more you understand, the more you love; the more you love, the more you understand. They are two sides of one reality. The mind of love and the mind of understanding are the same. In a relationship, if you can see the nature of interbeing between you and the other person, you can see that his suffering is your own suffering, and your happiness is his own happiness. With this way of seeing, you speak and act differently. This in itself can relieve so much suffering." — Thich Nhat Hanh

"It's a state of mind. It's the perception that you lack nothing. That you are equipped with everything you need, both now and for the future. A person confident in their social life will feel as though they lack nothing in their social life. A person with no confidence in their social life believes that they lack the prerequisite coolness to be invited to everyone's pizza party. It's this perception of lacking something that drives their needy, clingy, and/or bitchy behavior." — Mark Manson

"Less is More." — Robert Browning

"Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler." — Albert Einstein

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to remove." — Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Jobs's taste for merciless criticism was notorious; Ive recalled that, years ago, after seeing colleagues crushed, he protested. Jobs replied, 'Why would you be vague?', arguing that ambiguity was a form of selfishness: 'You don't care about how they feel! You're being vain, you want them to like you'. Ive was furious, but came to agree.
I know, Ive said. Like an iPhone, an Apple Watch is only simple and pure— to quote Ive's film— until it's a threat to sleep, solitude, or the happiness of someone near you in a cinema. "Beauty is a miracle of things going together imperfectly." — Jonathan Ive

"The search is the meaning, the search for beauty, love, kindness and restoration in this difficult, wired and often alien modern world. The miracle is that we are here, that no matter how undone we've been the night before, we wake up every morning and are still here. It is phenomenal just to be. This idea overwhelms some people. I have found that the wonder of life is often most easily recognizable through habits and routines. Order and discipline are important to meaning for me. Discipline, I have learned, leads to freedom, and there is meaning in freedom. If you don't do ritual things in order, the paper doesn't read as well, and you'll be thrown off the whole day. But when you can sit for a while at your table, reach for your coffee, look out the window at the sky or some branches, then back down at the paper or a book, everything feels right for the moment, which is maybe all we have." — Anne Lamott

Carr writes of the moment he chose sanity over chaos: "Slowly, I remembered who I was. Hope floats. The small pleasures of being a man, of being a drunk who doesn't drink, an addict who doesn't use, buoyed me. You are always told to recover for yourself, but the only way I got my head out of my own ass was to remember that there were other asses to consider. I now inhabit a life I don't deserve, but we all walk this earth feeling we are frauds. The trick is to be grateful and hope the caper doesn't end any time soon." — David Carr

"No considerate God would destroy the human mind by making it so rigid and unadaptable as to depend upon one book, the Bible, for all the answers." — Alan Watts

"One has to decide whether one's fears or one's hopes are what should matter most." — Gawande

"Before you tell your life what you intend to do with it, listen for what it intends to do with you. Before you tell your life what truths and values you have decided to live up to, let your life tell you what truths you embody, what values you represent. If the self seeks not pathology but wholeness, as I believe it does, then the willful pursuit of vocation is an act of violence toward ourselves — violence in the name of a vision that, however lofty, is forced on the self from without rather than grown from within. True self, when violated, will always resist us, sometimes at great cost, holding our lives in check until we honor its truth. Vocation does not come from willfulness. It comes from listening. I must listen to my life and try to understand what it is truly about — quite apart from what I would like it to be about — or my life will never represent anything real in the world, no matter how earnest my intentions. Vocation does not mean a goal that I pursue. It means a calling that I hear. Before I can tell my life what I want to do with it, I must listen to my life telling the who I am. I must listen for the truths and values at the heart of my own identity, not the standards by which I must live — but the standards by which I cannot help but live if I am living my own life. We listen for guidance everywhere except from within. My life is not only about my strengths and virtues; it is also about my liabilities and my limits, my trespasses and my shadow. An inevitable though often ignored dimension of the quest for wholeness is that we must embrace what we dislike or find shameful about ourselves as well as what we are confident and proud of. What a long time it can take to become the person one has always been! How often in the process we mask ourselves in faces that are not our own. How much dissolving and shaking of ego we must endure before we discover our deep identity — the true self within every human being that is the seed of authentic vocation." — Parker J. Palmer

"One must have the courage of one's vocation and the courage to make a living from one's vocation." — Van Gogh

"We stand where we will stand, on little plots of ground, where we are maybe called to stand (though who knows what that means?) — in our congregations, classrooms, offices, factories, in fields of lettuces and apricots, in hospitals, in prisons (on both sides, at various times, of the gates), in streets, in community groups. And it is sacred ground if we would honor it, if we would bring to it a blessing of sacrifice and risk… Our mission is to plant ourselves at the gates of Hope — not the prudent gates of Optimism, which are somewhat narrower; nor the stalwart, boring gates of Common Sense; nor the strident gates of Self-Righteousness, which creak on shrill and angry hinges (people cannot hear us there; they cannot pass through); nor the cheerful, flimsy garden gate of Everything Is Gonna Be All Right. But a different, sometimes lonely place, the place of truth-telling, about your own soul first of all and its condition, the place of resistance and defiance, the piece of ground from which you see the world both as it is and as it could be, as it will be; the place from which you glimpse not only struggle, but joy in the struggle. And we stand there, beckoning and calling, telling people what we are seeing, asking people what they see." — Stafford

"The test of one's decency is how much of a fight one can put up after one has stopped caring, and after one has found out that one can never please the people they wanted to please." — Willa Cather

"It comes to me. Part of my leaving the media on all day is a way of… my mind has trained itself to have a very sensitive system of radar about certain words, expressions, topics, and areas of discussion that come up. There are things that interest me more than others, and then there are things that jump out. There's one thing I learned about the mind as a young man, when I quit school. I read a book – half of it, anyway – called Psycho-Cybernetics. The author said that the brain is a goal-seeking and problem-solving machine, and if you put into it the parameters of what it is you need or want or expect, and you feed it, it will do a lot of work without you even noticing. Because the brain does that. It forms neural networks. There are areas in your brain that communicate with one another because of a need they perceive that they have – if you have trained yourself passively or actively, which I have – to look for certain kinds of things to say, and certain kinds of things to compare. Because a lot of comedy is comparing – the things that are cultural or social or language-oriented, or just plain silly. My brain got used to the fact that that made it feel good – that I liked finding those things. So the brain does networking on its own where those connections get made, and pretty soon there's an automatic process going on all the time that leaves out a lot of unimportant or less interesting areas, and concentrates on areas it has trained itself to passively look for. Because it knows that when it finds one of them, you're going to feel good! Oh, boy, I found another one! Let's go back to work and find some more of these for him. What I do is, I collect my notes. I have about 1,300 separate files in my computer – they change from week to week, because I combine or expand files – and they are 44 years worth of collecting thoughts, notions, ideas, pieces of data, and material. Anything I think might have promise for my writing sometime in the future goes on a piece of paper, and that becomes a stack of papers, and that gets a topic title. The scientist is at work with the little artist – he's got a scientist buddy – and this guy's indexing things and figuring out categories, and that stuff goes in the computer. And every time you see it, touch it, look at it, or think of it, it gets deeper in the brain, the network gets deeper, and at some point, it gets to be a telling mass that says to you, OK. Take a look at this now. This is gonna be funny. You got enough data, take a look at this. So I'm drawn to something and start writing about it, and then you really start writing, and that's when the real ideas pounce out, and new ideas, and new thoughts and images, and then bing, ba-bam ba-boom, that's the creative part." — George Carlin

"Aim to be a poet. If you can't do that, aim to be an actor. If you can't do that, do your best to be an improviser. And if you can't even pull that off, you'll have to settle for being a comedian." — Del Close

"All matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration – that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively. There's no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we're the imagination of ourselves." — Bill Hicks

"Now it's said that selfish people love themselves. I would say that that belies a misunderstanding of the whole thing: yourself is really something that is impossible to love. One obvious reason for this is that one's self, when you try to focus on it to love it or to know it, it is oddly elusive.
Let me illustrate why. Once there was a fish who lived in the great ocean, and because the water was transparent, and always conveniently got out of the way of his nose when he moved along, he didn't know he was in the ocean. Well, one day the fish did a very dangerous thing, he began to think: 'Surely I am a most remarkable being, since I can move around like this in the middle of empty space'. Then the fish became confused because of thinking about moving and swimming, and he suddenly had an anxiety paroxysm and thought he had forgotten how. At that moment he looked down and saw the yawning chasm of the ocean depths, and he was terrified that he would drop. Then he thought: 'If I could catch hold of my tail in my mouth, I could hold myself up'. And so he curled himself up and snapped at his tail. Unfortunately, his spine wasn't quite supple enough, so he missed. As he went on trying to catch hold of his tail, the yawning black abyss below became ever more terrible, and he was brought to the edge of total nervous breakdown. The fish was about to give up, when the ocean, who had been watching with mixed feelings of pity and amusement, said, 'What are you doing?'. 'Oh', said the fish, 'I'm terrified of falling into the deep dark abyss, and I'm trying to catch hold of my tail in my mouth to hold myself up'. So the ocean said, 'Well, you've been trying that for a long time now, and still you haven't fallen down. How come?'. 'Oh, of course, I haven't fallen down yet', said the fish, 'because, because–I'm swimming!'. 'Well', came the reply, 'I am the Great Ocean, in which you live and move and are able to be a fish, and I have given all of myself to you in which to swim, and I support you all the time you swim. Instead of exploring the length, breadth, depth, and height of my expanse, you are wasting your time pursuing your own end'. From then on, the fish put his own end behind him (where it belonged) and set out to explore the ocean. Well, that shows one of the reasons it's difficult to love yourself: Your spine isn't quite supple enough." — Alan Watts

"The best way for an improviser to look good is by making their fellow players look good." — Charna Halpern

"It's so important to have a hobby. A hobby is something creative that's just for you. You don't try to make money or get famous off it, you just do it because it makes you happy. A hobby is something that gives but doesn't take. Your art is for the world to see, a hobby is for you and your friends. No pressure, no plans. It's regenerative, it's like church." — Austin Kleon

"Leave home. Your brain gets too comfortable in your everyday surroundings. You need to make it uncomfortable. Travel makes the world look new, and when the world looks new, our brains work harder." — Austin Kleon

"Find the most talented person in the room, and go stand next to him. If you ever find that you're the most talented person in the room, you need to find another room." — Austin Kleon

"Modern art = I could do that + Yeah but you didn't." — Craig Damrauer